A Father’s Day Thank You to My Dad

My Dad is one of the greatest men I know.  As I’ve gotten older, gotten married and raising children, I realize even more how great he is.

Thank you, Daddy for …

Teaching me the right things to do. Showing me that a righteous life is a good life. Trusting me. Letting me try, fail, get back up, try again, and succeed. Scrimping funds (without me even knowing how much) to send me to college. Being a wonderful example of hard work (and that hard work will always pay off in the end). Showing us in our youth that no one is any better than any one else and that we should be friends with everyone. Proving that a smile and friendly banter can get you far in life. Sacrificing a lot to provide for your family. Showing me that service in the church is a privilege. Displaying the value of prayer. Loving our mother so much. Telling all your silly jokes. Making us do chores growing up. Giving us the “I’m not raising cows, I’m raising children” experience. Not giving me everything I said I wanted as a child because it made me appreciate what I had and learn the value of earning something. Honoring your priesthood. Thank you for the daddy-daughter interviews. Introducing me to Yoohoo on our daddy-daughter motorcycle rides in Carrollton, Ga. Being a good Papa. Showing us the importance of a thirst for knowledge. Thinking I’m a good baker. Being so stinkin’ fun.
I could go on and on. I love him than a hound dog loves a sunny porch.
(I can only hope that I raise my kids in a way that they will want to write a note like this to me one day.)

I HAD to Share: Every Night I Hit “The Parenting Wall”

.Every Night, I Hit “The Parenting Wall”

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http://www.babble.com/parenting/every-night-i-hit-the-parenting-wall

Every evening, some time after dinner, I start to feel my mental grip loosening a bit. A wave of exhaustion laps up to the shores of my patience. It’s been a long day, you know. Same as yesterday, probably the same as tomorrow.

This is “the parenting wall.” And every night, I hit it.

Somewhere between getting woken up at the crack of friggin’ dawn and my kids’ 8:00 bedtime, my enthusiasm fades.

The day begins with me Tasmanian Deviling around my house, getting my kids ready for the day.

I’ve worked some gritty, draining jobs in my life. But just for getting kids ready in the morning, we all deserve medals of efficiency and valor, us parents. We just do.

Parents work, whether it’s at some desk job or carting around kids all day, the fact of the matter is that most of us are breaking our asses all day long.

I survive it all by trying to imagine some pin dot of promise at the end of the tunnel. A half hour where I will sit on the sofa and watch TV before I collapse. And sometimes I stick a cold beer into my fantasy scenario too. Just because.

But most of the time, I hit the parenting wall long before I get there, I’m afraid.

Come about 6:30 pm, I’ll be trying to psyche myself up for the final stretch, preparing Charlie for bed and all, when I’ll hear those older two fighting about some ridiculously inane thing.

I remind myself to breath, but dude. I’m spent. I just am. I don’t care if you want to judge me, but I’m like this close to walking out the back screen door and getting in then Honda and aiming it towards Mexico, towards a whole different life.

This is every night, remember.

The parenting wall.

My love for my children, once a warm and bubbling spring at 8 am, has now congealed into a hard layer of sick-of-it-all and despair.

I want to be saved from this feeling of my face being smooshed up against the wall.

I can’t take anymore!

I’m tired! I’m hungry! I’m dehydrated! I’m lonely! I need to pay the bills! I need to get the laundry out of the washer before everything is just a wrinkled waste of my precious time!

Oh my God, NOOOOO!

Charlie just crapped his diaper and is crying because I’m footballing him around in his own filth and surprise! Here comes Violet and she has ice cream all over her hands and she is carrying my laptop and making it all sticky and surprise! She’s bawling because Henry just pinched her in revenge!

I close my eyes. I try to breath slowly. I take a big country whiff of the kid poop and I try and be Zen about it all. I imagine my fantasy scenario, tell myself I’m almost there.

Sometimes it works and I get there without losing it and I feel so proud.

Other nights, I’m almost there when I come across two kids kicking each other as they put on their PJ’s in the middle of a whole roll of toilet paper unraveled all over the room and I let go completely. I fall away from the Zen and I become a bear, a lion, an elephant with a Philly accent.

Some nights, I yell.

I do what I have to do.

But we get there, eventually. We get sorted out and tired heads end up sleeping safe and sound under the roof of this nuthouse we call home. That makes me happy. And proud. It really really does. I did it. We made it.

I’m so hungry.

Please stay asleep for the next 40 minutes. I need it, my loves. I need my TV time. I really really do.

The parenting wall, man.

It’s a b*tch.

But I guess I wouldn’t change a thing.

Top 10 Benefits of Having a High-Pressure Career before Having Kids

  1. I can look as cool as a single girl lounging at the pool when my kids are tearing in two separate directions at the playground.laura OPM 29mar2012_v2

    Though I may not feel so calm on the inside.
  2. I can negotiate like a beast with my four-year old
    Adelaide was born with the negotiation skills of steel.
  3. I can tune out almost any noise thanks to my early careers days working in a cubicle.
    Those pesky toys with sound? Don’t even hear ‘em.
  4. Multitasking? Not a problem.
    As I am writing this I’m brushing Adelaide’s My Little Pony hair at her request, planning dinner, and making sure Oliver doesn’t escape out of the doors he just figured out how to open.
  5. My difficult bosses and clients were a great warm-up to the most demanding bosses ever – 18-month-old Oliver and four-year old Adelaide.
    And demanding is an understatement.
  6. After making big decisions affecting the fate of thousands of people, picking out names and schools doesn’t seem so intimidating
    Though that daily what-to-make-for-dinner decision is a killer.
  7. I’m comfortable being resourceful and solving problems in a pinch.
    It is amazing what you can find in your bag that can double as a toy.
  8. Efficiency? Got that down.
    I only have 30 minutes to bathe both kids, myself, dress all three, pack snacks and necessities in a bag, send off three important emails and make that phone call? Consider it done!
  9. I’ve been primed to live on little sleep and meals.
    Wait?! It’s been 10 hours since I last ate and I’m still on the road? Gimme a few Goldfish and I’m good.
  10. I understand non-stop from morning ‘til night.
    That crazy stressful job when I woke up at 4 a.m. to attack the to-do list before people started to blow up my phone? That was a perfect indoctrination to the world of babies and toddlers and the on-the-clock-round-the-clock life of motherhood.